Watch the USA capture its first ever Olympic medal in men's luge

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Although Ridgefield native Tucker West saw his struggles continue on the second day of the luge men's singles competition at the Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea, he and the rest of the USA Luge program did have cause to celebrate.

Chris Mazdzer is the first American male to win a medal in the singles luge event since 1964, when the sport debuted at the Olympics.

There aren't many Olympic events that the United States hasn't medaled in.

Single's luge consists of four timed runs on a sled down a narrow, serpentine track.

It's no surprise, Mazdzer's second run was the fastest in that heat demonstrating he was capable of medaling. Mazdzer finished both the 2010 Vancouver Games and the 2014 Sochi Games in 13th place.

Gleirscher's cumulative time over four runs (Runs 1 and 2 took place on Saturday, with Runs 3 and 4 on Sunday) was 3:10.702, as he won by 0.026 over Mazdzer.

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German Felix Loch, who has won three consecutive gold medals, was in first in the last run but hit the wall and ended up fifth. Germany's Johannes Ludwig rounded out the podium with a time of 3:10.932.

Fans of Chris Mazdzer, including his girlfriend Mara Marian (C), react following his third run during the luge men's singles at the Olympic WInter Games PyeongChnag 2018 on February 11, 2018 in PyeongChang, South Korea.

The leader going into the final run was two-time defending gold medalist Felix Loch of Germany, who was looking to equal the record of his countryman, George Hackl, who finished first in 1992, '94 and '98.

And, he made history early Sunday, winning silver in the men's luge.

The best the US had ever done in the Olympic event was fourth-place finishes by Tony Benshoof in 2006 and Adam Heidt in 2002.

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