Illinois Sues Uber Over 2016 Data Breach

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Uber has revealed that 2.7 million British riders and drivers were affected by a 2016 data breach that it covered up for more than a year. The organisation has already parted company with its chief security officer, Joe Sullivan, over the 13-month cover-up. Uber investigated and confirmed that the individual and one other person had in fact accessed Uber's files, which included the names, email addresses, and telephone numbers of about 50 million passengers worldwide.

"We are monitoring the affected accounts and have flagged them for additional fraud protection", the company said.

The Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) had previously said it had "huge concerns" about the breach.

The NPC considers Uber as a Personal Information Controller and should provide detailed information on the nature of the incident, the scope of measure, and the remedial measures taken.

"We'll be working with the NCSC plus other relevant authorities in the United Kingdom and overseas to determine the scale of the breach, how it has affected people in the United Kingdom and what steps need to be taken by the firm to ensure it fully complies with its data protection obligations". People should continue to be vigilant and follow the advice from the NCSC.

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Amid reports that Uber paid hackers $100,000 to delete customer information that was obtained in a data breach, a group of senators raised questions on Monday about the alleged breach and the company's response.

The Dutch data protection authority will take the lead, as Uber's global headquarters are sited in Amsterdam.

The government said the new Data Protection Bill would grant the ICO further powers to defend consumer interests, and issue even higher fines of up to £18m, or 4% of an organisation's global turnover in exceptional cases.

According to Uber, the 2.7 million figure is "approximate rather than an accurate and definitive account" - this is because the information gathered by the firm's app does not always specify where users live. The trial, brought by Alphabet-owned Waymo, centres on allegations that Uber stole autonomous vehicle technology trade secrets from it.

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