Apple looking beyond Qualcomm for smartphone components

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The dominant chipmaker filed a lawsuit in a California state court claiming Apple broke a contract when it emailed Qualcomm asking for "highly confidential" information about how its chips work in devices that run an unnamed carrier's network.

As Apple is gets ready to hold their Fiscal Q4 Results financial conference, the news of Qualcomm Inc suing Apple Inc again hits the wire.

The drop was due to reports of Apple considering using components from Intel and MediaTek, thus dropping Qualcomm from the equation entirely.

Apple then made a decision to stop making licensing payments to Qualcomm, which led to a massive drop in revenue for Qualcomm.

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In January, around the same time Apple sued Qualcomm, a Qualcomm shareholder filed a class-action lawsuit against the company, demanding compensation for a fall in share prices that he blamed on the way Qualcomm's management has handled its anti-trust controversies.

It's already attempted to in the past, as the iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus carried both Intel and Qualcomm chips, as did this year's iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus. Qualcomm are claiming Apple breached their contracted agreement, which was arranged regarding the software necessary for mobile chips to interact with the rest of an Apple handset.

The battle between Apple and Qualcomm has been raging on since the year began as our list of reports below proves out.

In contrast, revenue from Qualcomm's licensing business fell 36 percent to $1.21 billion in the quarter ended September 24. One of the most recent legal developments is between Qualcomm and Apple, where another lawsuit has surfaced as part of an ongoing fight between the two. Apple's move comes amid a dispute over the iPhone maker's access to the San Diego-based company's proprietary technology, according to people familiar with the matter.

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